Down the Rabbit Hole, with Janus

I really think the girl's becoming unhinged.....or she's been into the gin cabinet. See if you can follow the train of thought, the leaps of logic, the backtracking and flipflopping without getting positively dizzy. It's strangely fascinating to behold, however gravol is recommended for those with sensitive stomaches.

More scienctific evidence for the effectiveness of 'one addict/alcoholic helping another'

Here is a report about recent research from Oxford University on the effect of having a supportive social network (as happens in AA):-

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/science/2016/04/28/having-lots-of-friends-is-a-...

Note:

“One theory, known as 'the brain opioid theory of social attachment', is that social interactions trigger positive emotions when endorphin binds to opioid receptors in the brain.

With All Due Respect To James Brown..........

“The Godfather Of Soul” James Brown did one of his all-time smash hits entitled “Papa’s Got A Brand New Bag” in 1965. That song earned him an Emmy award for Best R&B Recording.

I truly hate to defame James Brown’s artistic achievement by likening jAnus’s burgeoning new attitude here @ OPF to one of the crowning achievements of “The Godfather Of Soul", but jAnus's new and yet even more monumentally bullshit-intensive attitude mandates recognition. In a phrase, I think we all need to recognize that “Mama’s got a Brand New Rag”....

Another AA apolgist's warped perspective.

Excerpts from Maia Szalavits' new book "Unbroken Chain" appearing in today's "the influence"
http://theinfluence.org/unbroken-brain-my-its-complicated-relationship-w...
In 1935, when Bill Wilson and Robert “Dr. Bob” Smith created AA, both were members of a then-popular Christian revival movement known as the Oxford Group. In fact, the Steps themselves were based on the Oxford Group’s principles of surrender to God, confession, prayer and service. But AA soon split off from the Oxford group, which had been founded by a controversial preacher named Frank Buchman (just before the split, Buchman did not help his reputation when he praised Hitler and sought to convert the Nazi leadership into becoming his followers)(1). AA wanted to be a more ecumenical organization and the Oxford Group did not want its primary business to be converting drunks, which made the parting mutual.

So how did a Jewish girl from Manhattan embrace and later come to question what I now see was designed as a Christian form of recovery? And why don’t I advocate the 12 Steps for all, since they apparently worked for me during the critical first five years of my recovery? Well—like every other issue in addiction—it’s complicated.

For me, it started in rehab in 1988, at a program, now closed, in Westchester, New York, which was a typical Minnesota-model, 12-step, 28-day treatment. Specifically, I began to feel like I might be able to accept the program when I first heard an AA speaker who happened to be a doctor. He made life in recovery sound more like fun and less like the tedious drudgery of constantly having to try to avoid everything I loved, from sugar to music, which was what others seemed to highlight. He was an outside speaker and he talked more about what he got from recovery than what he’d given up.

In rehab, too, I was immersed in a milieu where every authority seemed to endorse the Steps as my only hope. Because medical professionals—from the hospital detox doctors and nurses to the rehab physician and counselors to the AA doc—accepted what seemed like religion as actual medicine, I thought that there had to be strong science behind it. Since these apparent experts told me both that addiction was a medical disease and that the treatment was meeting, confession and prayer, I didn’t notice the contradiction that is now obvious to me when stating these facts.

Instead, it was a relief to see addiction as a disease and to know that while I was responsible for my recovery, the fact that I’d gotten hooked didn’t mean I was a bad person. In meetings, I’d hear others talk about how they had hated and blamed themselves—and how the steps were the key to making past wrongs right. I knew that I needed to find some way to get over my sense of failure about the disastrous wrong turn my life had taken. Since I’d left Columbia College, I’d found my future unbearable without drugs.

In the program, I learned that if I could just stop hating myself for hating myself, I didn’t feel quite so bad. While the Steps didn’t formally address the issue, in meetings I’d hear people talk about swinging from grandiosity to self-loathing, often described in AA’s earthy language as “feeling like the piece of shit in the center of the universe” or being “an egomaniac with an inferiority complex.” I knew exactly what they meant and felt understood. Another slogan that helped was “don’t compare your insides to someone else’s outsides,” meaning that most people try to present the best parts of themselves, but you can’t hide your negative aspects from yourself. This concept is especially useful in the age of social media.

Simply hating myself was bearable if unpleasant; hating myself for doing so on top of that was not. And hearing friends, whom I knew to be good and kind, describe their own self-loathing helped me see how incorrect self-perceptions could be. This allowed me to ease up on myself, which reduced my need for escape. I began to learn the critical recovery skill of self-compassion.

Part of what the program gave me was hope: what AA calls the “power of example.” Seeing people similar to me get better made a real difference—and I still think that this is often a crucial element in recovery. Although research shows that whether a counselor has his or her own addiction history does not affect outcomes (2), some contact with people who have been there and recovered often matters.

In fact, research suggests that the supportive community that 12-step programs provide is the main active ingredient in their success, when they work. The data is clear that social support aids both mental and physical health—and that people with more of it are much more likely to recover. Social support is the single most important factor in mitigating severe stress and trauma (3), which often contribute to addictions. Love doesn’t always cure all—but without it, healing from psychological and learning disorders is almost impossible. We all tend to learn best when we feel safe and curious and want to connect and win our teachers’ respect.

I also found some specific elements of the 12-step structure and literature helpful, beyond its large, welcoming community. For one, when you go to meetings daily, you hear thousands of stories and comments. Few other opportunities exist to hear people discuss their challenges and the mundane thoughts that disturb or distress them. With friends, partners and families, we often want to hide this part of ourselves, so as not to upset or bore them—or, sometimes, because we don’t want to display weaknesses or give those who might hurt us additional weapons.

Has anybody on this forum ever heard of 'Common Purpose?'

Yes
100% (1 vote)
No
0% (0 votes)
Total votes: 1

The Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP)

I was wondering what was in the UK remaining in the EU for Obama. Somebody suggested that the UK was one of the few if the only European Nation backing TTIP. I'll have to check on that one. One thing is certain however its not for the benefit of the British people.....thats for sure

A little off subject of AA about the Musician Prince Rogers Nelson (June 7, 1958 – April 21, 2016) who may get an honorary doctorate from the University of Minnesota which gives insight into the honorary degree supposedly offered to Bill Wilson for AA.

Dr. Prince?

Officials at the University of Minnesota are weighing whether to award Prince an honorary doctorate -- something they were considering before the musician's death. The university's president told CNN Sunday that the nomination will likely be approved by an honors committee and then go to the university's board of regents and president in June for the final say.

Obama vistits the UK

We know he's arrived at Stansted Airport today........but when is he leaving?Not only the UK but the White House as well? I wouldn't normally comment on US Politics (Unlike Obama continually poking his nose in OUR Affairs).............. but good riddance to bad rubbish

Who is the biggest advertisement for the UK leaving the EU?

Merkel
0% (0 votes)
Cameron
0% (0 votes)
Obama
100% (1 vote)
Total votes: 1

Political Joke

What's the difference between World War 2 and the UK EU Referendum? This time a US President is backing the Germans

Wish I had friends Like Rog, and Dwaye to talk me out of AA

A little silly, but no Cult Awarness Blog would be complete without watching this. And, yes, you have to watch the whole episode. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OpD6ibXhQlU

Great Australian article on AA (with Orange quotes)

http://academicmisconceptionsofaainoz.weebly.com/

It is super long so I copy and pasted only 1/4 of it.

"Australian Academic Misconceptions: Alcoholics Anonymous

The most widely available program for alcohol-dependent people in Australia

Here's Everything We Heard Bernie Sanders Say About Drugs at His NYC Rally Last Night

Some encouraging, sane talk about drug and alcohol policies:

Here's Everything We Heard Bernie Sanders Say About Drugs at His NYC Rally Last Night


http://theinfluence.org/heres-everything-we-heard-bernie-sanders-say-about-drugs-at-his-nyc-rally-last-night/

Why is Bernie Sanders the only Presidential candidate who can talk about these issues in a sane, realistic manner?

The "Addict" Debate: Why We Really Need to Keep Talking (and Listening)

Another very interesting discussion:

The "Addict" Debate: Why We Really Need to Keep Talking (and Listening)

by Johann Hari

http://theinfluence.org/we-really-need-to-keep-talking-and-listening-about-the-word-addict/

RIP Dick B., pro AA author.

Published 46 books and 1700 Articles on AA.

d. 9/29/2015

I didn't know till now.

Why doctors shouldn't have their own secret programs to fight addiction

For the fifth time since 2008, CMA is pushing a measure in the state legislature to reestablish a substance abuse program for physicians that was repeatedly shown to be a failure during its 27 years of existence before its abolition in 2008. http://www.latimes.com/business/hiltzik/la-fi-hiltzik-diversion-20160407...

The Movement to End the War on Drugs Is Going Global

The Movement to End the War on Drugs Is Going Global
By Johann Hari / Los Angeles Times


http://www.alternet.org/drugs/drug-war-rebels

The Czech official responsible for drug policy is Jindrich Voboril. He noted:

The drug war, it seemed to him, was based on ideology, not results, just like the communist system he had fought successfully to overthrow. If you put pledges for a "drug-free world" in a different font, he says, it could be a Stalinist slogan.

Yo there Janus:

I'd like a "pro-*A" input on this, plus you often bring up the subject, so I'll direct it to you.
Either from your own personal viewpoint or what *A teaches about it:

When *A talks about 'powerlessness,' and talks about the absence of or lack of 'free will,' is it only a reference to the substance/substances a person is 'addicted' to, or does it cover the person's life in general?

(Thank you for your input)

Capture

This video raises more questions than it answers, but it is a provocative and different take on addiction.

http://www.theatlantic.com/video/index/477918/capture-a-unified-theory-on-...

Is this what Bill Wilson called a "Spiritual Awakening" on LSD?

"It is also related to what people sometimes call 'ego-dissolution,' which means the normal sense of self is broken down and replaced by a sense of reconnection with themselves, others and the natural world. This experience is sometimes framed in a religious or spiritual way -- and seems to be associated with improvements in well-being after the drug's effects have subsided."

Its a Wonderfurful Day in the Neigborhood, our New Neigbors

Ok, dudes, dudettes and children of all ages. It is happening. Competition. Capitalism. Two words that will drive the changes as yet unknown in the field of Addiction.
The Good, the Bad and the Ugly. First, Addiction Recovery is expanding into the Private Sector. Second, this sector is building for profit neighborhood Rehab Centers. And the Ugly, these centers are not looking for Medicare or Medicaid Dollars and sadly they do embrace the notion that addiction is a disease.

It

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